Even Greater Work of Redemption (Thomas Brooks)

Thomas Brooks reminds us that while the work of Creation is glorious, but the work of redemption in the gospel is even more glorious:

“If you compare the work of redemption with other great works, you must necessarily conclude that the work of redemption is a great work. The making of the world was a great work of God, but yet that did but cost him a word of his mouth, a ‘let it be;’ he spake the word, and it was done; ‘He said, “let there be light, and there was light,’ &c., Gen 1:3-6, 9, 11, 14, 20; but the work of redemption cost Christ’s dearest blood. Much matter of admiration doth the work of redemption afford us. The work of creation is many ways admirable, yet not to be compared with the work of redemption, wherein the power, wisdom, justice, mercy, and other divine attributes of God do much more shine forth; and wherein the redeemed reap much more good than Adam did by his creation, which will evidently appear by observing these particular differences:

FIRST, in the creation God brought something out of nothing; but in the work of redemption, out of one contrary he brought another; out of death he brought life. This was a work of far greater power, wisdom, mercy…

SECOND, in creation there was but a word; and thereupon the work followed; in redemption there was doing and dying. The work of redemption could be brought about by none but God…

THIRD, in the creation God arrayed himself with majesty, power, and other like properties, fit for a great work; in the work of redemption he put on weakness, he assumed a nature subject to infirmities, and the infirmities of that nature…

FOURTH, in the work of creation there was nothing to withstand God, to make opposition against God; but in the work of redemption there was justice against mercy, wrath against pity; death, and he that had the power of death, was vanquished…

FIFTH, by creation man was made after God’s image, like him, Gen 1:26-27; by redemption man was made a member of the same mystical body ‘whereof Christ is the head,’…

SIXTH, by creation man received a natural being, by redemption a spiritual.

SEVENTH, by creation man received a possibility to stand, by redemption a certainty of standing and impossibility of falling…

EIGHTH, by creation man was placed in an earthly paradise, but by redemption he is advanced to an heavenly paradise.”

From “Paradise Opened” by Thomas Brooks (complete works vol 5, pages 353-354).

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